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Improve Your Health For Free: Step-By-Step Instructions on How to Nose-Breathe All The Time

Posted by Lisa Bowen on Wednesday, September 4, 2013 Under: Nose Breathing
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I’ve seen statistics that almost 90% of Americans have some chronic respiratory, sleep or nervous condition that is worsened, if not caused, by over-breathing.  And typically, this occurs by breathing with the large mouth rather than the small nose.

I wish I had a dollar for every time someone has called or come to see me and said that they don’t mouth-breathe, even though I can clearly hear it or see it.

Many healthy symptoms can diminish just by making this simple change.

Awareness

The first step is to become aware of whether you’re mouth-breathing or nose-breathing.   It’s usually not all one way or the other. 

Set a timer to go off hourly while you’re awake to observe your breathing pattern.  Observe your breathing too when you exercise, eat, talk or make transitions that require a quick energy boost , like getting in and out of a car or standing up.  

Ask friends and family to give you their feedback.  My best coach is my 8-year-old daughter, who loves to catch me mouth-breathing since I constantly point out when she is doing it.   I love it!  That alerts me that I am experiencing some stress I wasn’t aware of yet.

If you wake up in the morning with a dry mouth, odds are that you’re mouth-breathing when you sleep (and possibly snoring). 

Transitioning to Nasal Breathing

Consistently try to breathe through your mouth instead of your nose when you catch yourself.  For many people, mouth breathing is simply a habit that can easily be turned around once they put a little attention to it.

Sometimes, people have become accustomed to the larger air volume associated with mouth-breathing, and it will take longer to feel comfortable nose-breathing.  In this case, practice nose breathing when it’s the easiest.  When does your body needs the least oxygen?  When you’re sitting quietly, resting but alert.   

Consider that you are most-likely taking in less air when you nose breathe and that’s OK.  The average person is breathing twice as much air as 100 years ago because of over-eating, lack of exercise, the stress of modern life and other factors.  It may be temporarily uncomfortable but nasal breathing is not dangerous, it’s how we were meant to use our bodies.  

If it’s too hard to nose-breathe for long, measure how many seconds you can do it.  During your practice periods, alternate that with gentle mouth breathing, and increase the amount of time you can nose-breathe each day by a small factor like 5%.   

Treat this just like any exercise program you might begin for strength or stamina.  If you can manage to practice once a day for five minutes, do it!  If you can do it every hour, even better. 

If you mouth-breathe because your nose is congested, know that the more you breathe through your nose the less it will clog up.  Often I notice even if my nose is stuffed, there is usually a small opening in one nostril I can breathe through gently.  And when I do, the small opening widens, allowing me to breathe through my nose more comfortably.

For me the hardest challenge to nasal breathing is lying on my stomach on a massage table and breathing through the head rest.  My nose often congests but if I start gently breathing only wisps of air through my mouth, my nose opens.  
Another way to open the nose is by holding your breath for 3-5 seconds one or more times.  This works!  Try it.

We also support the use of props like nasal strips, stents, neti pots and medical supports to keep your nose open while practicing the life-lengthening habit of nasal breathing. 

Progressing

Once you can nose-breathe all the time at rest, you can work up to doing it when you eat, talk, exercise and engage in daily activities.

The key is to slow down – do everything only as fast as you can while nose-breathing.  Like learning any new skill, you might feel slow and clumsy at first.  After you get the hang of it, you will be functioning more smoothly and comfortably than before, as well as faster!

Before you go to bed, practice nasal breathing as a reminder to your system.  Then if you need more support at nighttime, consider using nasal strips or wearing a chin strap that keeps your mouth closed so you will breathe through your nose at night.

A person’s emotional state affects how easily he or she is breathing in any moment.  I have been practicing nasal breathing for quite some time, but even I can get tripped up when I am not admitting that I am upset.  I am alerted when I feel a physical symptom, like a tight chest or shortness of breath, and I start exploring my experience.  Inevitably I find that I have been mouth-breathing/over-breathing in distress.

Mouth-breathing is appropriate and necessary in an emergency that requires a fight-or-flight response.  Or when we are feeling huge emotions that require an equally large huge physical container to process.  I wouldn’t advise a grieving new widow to sob with her mouth closed!   In many if not most other circumstances, it’s appropriate to use nasal breathing to calm the body and mind down.


Is a stuffed nose keeping you from nose breathing? Click here to download our free report "5 Tools To Keep Your Nose Clear" right now!

In : Nose Breathing 



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